Original Factory Photos

The pictures in this category were all taken circa the 1920's by or for The Standard Electric Time Company and the Pacific Electric Clock Company, the latter having been acquired by Standard in 1923. It should be noted that the earlier production of Pacific is composed of parts unique to that company (although they obviously copied certain "Standard" design features), while later production contains components supplied by Standard, such as pendulums and pilot clocks.

You may click on any image to bring up a large version.

Master Clocks

The Standard Electric Time Company

Pacific Electric Clock Company

Slave Clocks

The Standard Electric Time Company

Pacific Electric Clock Company

Programs

The Standard Electric Time Company

Pacific Electric Clock Company

Hardware

The Standard Electric Time Company

Pacific Electric Clock Company

The remaining pictures are mostly from catalogs and data sheets published at various times by The Standard Electric Time Company

Three-circuit Master Clock with two four-circuit Program Clocks in base

Three-circuit Master Clock with two four-circuit Program Clocks in base, as installed at Malden (Massachusetts) High School.

From Bulletin No. 11, January, 1909.

Earliest known example of Eyebrow style case, having flat-top door.

Special Master Clock with four-circuit Switchboard and four-circuit Program Clock in base, as installed at Everett (Massachusetts) High School. Earliest known example of "Eyebrow" style case, having flat-top door.

From Bulletin No. 11, January, 1909.

Wood case secondary clock

Fig. 17 List No. 319

Wood Case Secondary Clock

From Catalog No. 32, January, 1910. A later, plainer version of the "No. 4 Secondary Clock".

Wood case secondary clock

Fig. 589 List No. 303

Wood Case Secondary Clock

From Catalog No. 32, January, 1910.

Wood case mantel clock

Fig. 452

Mantel Clock

Handsome wood case and 5" dial.

From Catalog No. 32, January, 1910.

120 beat self winding clock

Fig. 15 Oak

120-Beat Self-Winding Clock

Winding batteries in same case.

From Catalog No. 32, January, 1910.

80-beatclock

Fig. 578 Oak

Self-Winding Clock. 80 Beat

Metal ball pendulum. Oak case

From Catalog No. 32, January, 1910. "This 80-beat clock proves a popular, inexpensive one for controlling for controlling Time Stamps". Height, 36 1/2".

4-circuit,12-hour program instrument

Fig. 34 List No. 208

Program Clock

Catalog No. 32 illustration of a very early 4-circuit, 12-hour program instrument. Movement is mounted on a cast iron frame. Later cases were made with a solid wood side door having no glass and front door glass extending to bottom of door frame.

Post clock

Post Clock

From Catalog No. 32, January, 1910.

Hall Clock, Mercurial Pendulum, 60 Beat

Fig. 718 Hall Clock

Mercurial Pendulum, 60 Beat

These clocks are only made to order from special designs. The above design is shown merely as a typical example and not as a standard type.

From Catalog No. 32, January, 1910.

Marble Secondary Clock with Bronze Ring

Fig. 724

Marble Secondary Clock with Bronze Ring

Raised numerals, either Roman or Arabic, with raised minute dots and aluminum hands finished to harmonize.

Kind of Marble: White Italian, Sienna, Red Numidian, Onyx, or any other specified.

Finish of Ring, Hands and Numerals: Bronze, Verde, Antique, Gilt, Dull Black, Gun Metal, or like sample.

From Catalog No. 32, January, 1910.

Seconds beat clock

Fig. 126 List No. 560

Seconds-Beat Clock

Dial 12" Case 15 1/2"

The seconds-beat clock with ticker attachment shown in Figure 126 is a very useful device for science departments in high schools and colleges, as well as for operating rooms in hospitals. It is operated from the master clock through a seconds ticker attachment actuated by the pendulum. Switches are provided for starting or stopping either the hands or the sounder independently.

From Catalog No. 42, circa 1926. Timer, first model. Contains ordinary 24 volt straight impulse secondary movement with extended center arbor. Depressing plunger at top left releases driving mechanism, permitting manual reset to zero by twisting knob protruding from center of glass.

motor wound 12-hour chain and weight driven master clock
Data sheet illustration of a flush mounted motor wound 12-hour chain and weight driven master clock. Look closely to observe the long chain with small counterweight at extreme left inside recessed cabinet.
program cabinet containing 2 metal disc program movements
Data sheet illustration of program cabinet containing 2 metal disc program movements. The metal disc program was introduced in September of 1935 to meet competition from ITR/IBM. Prior to its appearance, ITR/IBM salesmen persuaded architects to specify "metal disc program" in their building plans, because Standard didn't make one and, in their opinion, Standard's thin paper ribbons were inferior and troublesome. In fact, the "Standard" metal disc program was noisy in operation, more difficult to service and somewhat confusing to set up. Few were sold and production was discontinued with the onset of World War II.
1930s Art Deco standing type master clock
Data sheet illustration of 1930s Art Deco standing type master clock. Note the earlier 4-cylinder (2 over 2) Invar pendulum.
newly designed master clock case introduced in 1946
Data sheet illustration of newly designed master clock case introduced in 1946 and designed for square dial. Apparently the factory had a surplus of round dials, some of which were used with the appropriate matting in this style case. With the introduction of this design the familiar "eyebrow" case, after a production run of approximately 40 years, was declared obsolete.

Photos of the Factory

Factory in 1912
One of the New Industrial Plants

Situated, 89 Logan Street, Springfield

Factory of the former Pelley Toilet Tissue Company as it appeared when purchased by George L. Riggs. Photo obviously retouched to include sign. Actual sign was probably done in gold leaf on a black smalted background. From WESTERN NEW ENGLAND magazine, December, 1912.

Factory in the 1920s
Factory as it appeared in the 1920s following the construction of several major additions.
Factory in 1945
Factory in 1945.
Factory after 1990 purchase by Springfield College
Factory after 1990 purchase by Springfield College, followed by $7 million in renovations, alterations and a major addition in converting it to housing for 224 undergraduate and graduate students, offices and classrooms. The large (48") clock visible in earlier pictures was removed, placed in storage and accidentally destroyed in a warehouse mishap. Its original #3 movement and hands do survive, however.

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To make this project a success, your help is needed. If you can provide a good picture of a special clock, it could well prove to be something that others would enjoy seeing here. Owners of clocks will receive credit unless they wish to remain anonymous. In return, or as a public service, we can provide in over 90% of cases, copies of original factory publications pertaining to a specific clock. These include master clock instructions, technical bulletins and wiring diagrams.

Inquiries concerning available materials may be E-mailed to

Thanks for looking!

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