Blodgett Clock Company

Blodgett Clock Company advertisement

Company History

Blodgett Bros. & Co. (later, Blodgett Clock Co.) was established by Aaron D. Blodgett, general manager of the Electric-Industrial Co. of 63 Kilby St., Boston, and George W. Blodgett, chief electrician for the Boston and Albany Railroad.

Blodgett was a small company in Boston that bought many of its parts from Standard and was eventually bought and phased out by Standard. Its products are of great interest to the Standard Electric Time collector.

Evidence is practically conclusive that the very first Blodgett master clocks contained minute-wind movements purchased from The Standard Electric Time Co.

James O. Lyman, inventor of the paper disc (1897) and paper ribbon (1901) program machines manufactured by Standard Electric Time, was granted a United States patent (No. 619,771 dated February 21, 1899) for a Blodgett secondary clock movement made entirely, or nearly so, by The Standard Electric Time Co. Oddly, however, these Standard-built movements bear the same “A. D. BLODGETT PAT. MAY 24, 98” stamp impression found on the commoner Blodgett secondary movements which do NOT appear to have been made by The Standard Electric Time Co.

Much later, on March 1, 1909, Aaron D. Blodgett and Fred S. Atkinson applied for a patent on an hourly-wound master clock movement featuring a long-throw winding lever-- apparently an unsuccessful attempt to improve on the design of the popular and reliable style “F” movement made by the Self Winding Clock Co. The resulting United States patent No. 939,791 was awarded on November 9 of the same year. Several examples of this movement have been located, although total production was probably less than 100 units. It uses Standard Electric Time A-frame plate stampings, with some parts of the winding mechanism strongly resembling those from the SWCC “F” movement. “-MADE BY- BLODGETT CLOCK CO. -BOSTON, U. S. A.-” appears on the front plate just below the seconds arbor. But the absence of any reference to a patent suggests that production was discontinued by or about the time the aforementioned patent was issued. From that point onward, all new Blodgett master clocks were originally equipped with regular production Standard Electric Time master regulator movements, which likewise were often installed to replace troublesome movements in earlier clocks. The very last few Blodgett cases contained everything “Standard” right from the beginning.

J. R. W.

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Use the link below to access the online gift shop of the American Clock and Watch Museum at Bristol, CT. Click on “Trade Catalog Reproductions” and you will find an early Blodgett catalog with a 4-page history by David N. Rooney added.

American Clock and Watch Museum Store

Blodgett master clock, serial #202

Oldest known Blodgett master clock, serial #202 Movement of Blodgett master clock, serial #202
Oldest known Blodgett master clock, serial #202. Completely original; clock and program movements by The Standard Electric Time Co. Made circa 1896 and probably resold as a used clock (with a new decal) about 10 years later.
Oldest known example of a Blodgett secondary clock movement
Oldest known example of a Blodgett secondary clock movement. Cast iron front plate serves also as magnet bridge. The other coil, not shown, is positioned diagonally opposite the coil visible in this photo. This is the movement described in the May 24, 1898 patent. However, that date is found stamped on later Blodgett movements of a more conventional design (see below).
Early Blodgett secondary clock n oak case Blodgett name on dial of secondary clock
An exceptionally well-preserved example of an early square oak Blodgett secondary clock.
Movement of Blodgett master clock
Movement of the clock shown above. Transitional type still using Standard Electric Time plate stampings, but otherwise having characteristics of the later movements.
The latest and commonest style of Blodgett master clock case
The latest and commonest style of Blodgett master clock case. Dial and pendulum of later vintage by The Standard Electric Time Co.
Large and exceptional marble dial clock originally used at Boston College
Large and exceptional marble dial clock originally used in the Assembly Hall at Boston College High School on Harrison Avenue in Boston's South End (original location of Boston College).
A popular style of Blodgett secondary clock
A popular style of Blodgett secondary clock.
A pair of Blodgett secondary clock movements
A pair of Blodgett secondary clock movements. Left: Movement invented by J. O. Lyman and made entirely, or nearly so, by The Standard Electric Time Co. Right: Typical movement presumably made by Blodgett.
Blodgett Grandfather Master Clock Case
Grandfather master clock case with original dial signed Blodgett Bros. & Co. Battery compartment in base. One of approximately 6 believed to have been made by or for Blodgett. Movement and pendulum missing.
Master clock with fancy dial
Master clock with fancy dial and case of specially selected quarter-sawn oak.
Original Blodgett No. 8 master clock case
Original Blodgett No. 8 master clock case. Movement, dial and pendulum later replaced by The Standard Electric Time Co.
Grandfather type movement found in Blodgett clock #436
“Grandfather” type movement found in Blodgett clock #436. Features Seth Thomas short-arc regulator escapement permitting its use in narrow-waisted tall clock case. Winding mechanism by Self Winding Clock Co., New York. Fine-tooth train. Hand-shaped plates indicate extremely limited production. Photo courtesy of Harold Steurer in Canada.
Master clock door glass decal circa 1898
Master clock door glass decal circa 1898.
Blodgett clock #467
Blodgett clock #467, circa 1910. An early, plainer version of the later style case. Original mercurial pendulum by the Waltham Clock Co. Movement and dial replaced around 1925 with equivalent components by The Standard Electric Time Co.
Office with Blodgett program clock at Wilbraham Academy, Wilbraham, Massachusetts
Office with Blodgett program clock at Wilbraham Academy, Wilbraham, Massachusetts. Secondary clock circuit(s) believed to have been added later. Clock probably removed from service in the late 1950's; present whereabouts unknown. Photo from the Academy's 1919 catalog.

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To make this project a success, your help is needed. If you can provide a good picture of a special clock, it could well prove to be something that others would enjoy seeing here. Owners of clocks will receive credit unless they wish to remain anonymous. In return, or as a public service, we can provide in over 90% of cases, copies of original factory publications pertaining to a specific clock. These include master clock instructions, technical bulletins and wiring diagrams.

Inquiries concerning available materials may be E-mailed to

Thanks for looking!

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© 2003 - 2016 Jeffrey R. Wood