Telechron Auxiliary Movements

An auxiliary electric clock movement has a means of keeping time even when the power is off. A spring-driven movement is connected with synchronous electric movement in such a manner that when the electric power fails, the spring-driven movement starts operating and keeps the clock's hands moving. Earlier Telechron auxiliary movements required manual winding of the mainspring, and later ones were automatically wound.

Auxiliary movement ca. 1919
Auxiliary movement ca. 1919 with a manually wound mainspring. The vertical rod on the left is the pendulum that controls the timekeeping when the power is off. When the power is on, the motor's field attracts and holds the pendulum to the right so it cannot oscillate.
Auxiliary movement ca. 1926
Auxiliary movement ca. 1926 with manually wound mainspring and balance wheel control for timkeeping. The motor pulls a little finger that stops the balance wheel from oscillating when the electric power is on.
Below: A Telechron auxiliary movement from ca. 1930.The motor winds a mainspring as it runs, and a little finger (below, center photo) keeps the balance wheel from oscillating as long there is power applied to the motor. When the power fails, the finger moves out of the way and allows the pin-lever escapement to start operating, keeping the hands on the correct time. A differential gearing arrangement (lower right photo) allows either the motor or the spring driven mechanism to move the hands of the clock. Thanks to Bruce Hannon for donating this movement.
Front of Telechron auxiliary movement from ca. 1930 Back of Telechron auxiliary movement from ca. 1930 Top of Telechron auxiliary movement from ca. 1930 Side of Telechron auxiliary movement from ca. 1930 Escapement of Telechron auxiliary movement from ca. 1930 Differential gearing of Telechron auxiliary movement from ca. 1930
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